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Steve Aitken wrote:-
Hi,
Yes it's ok to use this info.  I guess it would be Autumn 1970 or 1971 when I saw Terry Reid on the Stadium.  A few of us would go there every week or so and I can remember some fantastic nights in particular seeing Chuck Berry, Uriah Heep, Hawkwind, Argent, Sha Na Na, Terry Reid, Canned Heat, Stone The Crows and many more, although I cannot recall the dates or all of the bands.

Colette ? Sent me this..Thanks!
First of all, brilliant site. Brought back many happy memories. I was there between 1973 and 75, between the ages of 14 and 16 and could drone on for ages with my memories. The overwhelming one, which someone has already mentioned, was the smell of the place. A mix of teenage hormones and excitement, patchouli oil, afghan coats, great coats, joss sticks, dirt (stadium not the cleanest of places, which only added to its charm) probably some other substances that an innocent 14 year old wouldn't recognise... I can still remember walking through the inner doors and getting that blast of it. 

Note in my diary for Black Oak Arkansas/Sassafras gig - that Sassafras played Land of Hope and Glory and I am the Walrus. I remember the latter as one of the highlights of their set.

Keep it going, best wishes

 
Hi.
 
Just thought I'd drop you a line after discovering your wonderful stadium site . The stadium has many fond memories for me, we usually arrived early Saturday afternoon with cheap bottles of red wine and sat outside enjoying the atomosphere awaiting the gig. I was in the audience when Hawkwinds classic ' Space Ritual ' was recorded. other bands  I saw included Free. Groundhogs,Amon Dull 11,Can ,TenYears After.Rory Gallagher.David Bowie 72 gig,Mott The Hooples Rock and Roll circus, John Mayall, Canned Heat,Man, Frank Zappa, Robin Trower,Gong ,Focus Tangerine Dream,Nazareth.Brinsley Schwartz and probably countless others i can't remember !!!!!!
 
I still listen to the same type of music and still go to any decent gigs festivals etc .Ironically i now work just a a stones throw from the site of the old stadium which is now sadly being re-developed into yet more boring shops, offices and yuppie flats - a sad epitath for the old stadium but the memories will live on forever. It will be interesting to see  Stamps too bar in Waterloo decorated with stadium memorabilia . How about arranging a monthly get together for all ex stadium heads at such a venue or do you have any events planned in the future ?
Keep up the good work.
 
                                                       Best Wishes
                                                             Paul

My sister got me onto your website recently as we had a phase of going to the Stadium in the early 70s. After that I went to university in Lancaster & had to get into folk music as there was nothing else going on there!! I once obsessively made a list of all the gigs I could remember going to and noticed that I've got some Stadium gigs that aren't on your list. Thought you might appreciate the information. They are:
9/10/71 Mott the Hoople /Peace
14/10/71 Canned Heat/ Stone the Crows/Terry Reid
27/3/72 Jethro Tull/Tir Na Nog
24/5/72 Lindisfarne/Khan/Camel
17/6/72 Sha Na Na/Paladin
 
Also, if it's of any interest, Amazing Blondel supported Steeleye Span on the 21/10/72 gig.
 
I hope the dates are accurate as I kept a diary for the 2 years of 71 & 72!
 
Good luck with the website.
Gina Culling

Rob Dodson Mailed me
Had a look at the website over the weekend. It brings back lots of memories. I attended most of the concerts between 73 and 75 and your site got me digging around in the garage for any forgotten items. I found the Space Ritual programme and some beer mats (I'll scan these and send them to you). I've also found a copy of Music Scene from April 1974 - I'll plough through this and scan any relevant bits for you. Alas, I can't find any of the tickets that I had or the numerous copies of Sounds and NME.
 
When there was a big act on, we used to get to the Stadium early in the morning after staying up al night in the pub that my mate lived in (very convenient). All day we would sit on the steps and gloat that we would get the best place down by the stage. (Standing within inches of Deep Purple's PA, pumping out 120 decibels certainly wrecked my hearing and brain cells). The vigil at the front of the queue would only be interupted by trips for food and to the Cross Keys (and the St Pauls around the corner when we were barred from the 'Keys) for well earned liquid refreshment. I was born in 1958, so you can see that I was at an impressionable age at this time - I was very impressed!!
 
Occasionally, I did help out by helping to put the stage up etc, and thus gain free admission (I was still at school). I mat Rory Gallagher this way. He walked in with his mandoli under his arm, looking around and wondering why nobody would come over to him and make a fuss. After about 10 minutes and feeling sorry for him, I went over to talk to him - nice guy.
 
It became a way of life, attending the Stadium whenever I could. When there were no bands on, we used to go to the Moonstone in the Precinct. I remember going to the opening night of the Back of the Moon Club the night before an exam. To make it worse, I had to walk home to Kirkdale as by the time we staggered out, the buses had all gone to bed.
 
I have rediscovered an old mate from school through your site (Dave "the skull" Williams). We were in the same class at the Collegiate and attended the Stadium together. I got his email address from your guestbook.
 
I'll have a think of some of the concerts and dig around some other sources for information . (What concert did they show a film of Led Zep's Trampled Underfoot?)

MIKE ARTELL mailed me ages ago and I forgot to post !! silly me!!
Just found the Stadium website thanks to a friend.
Certainly conjours up some brilliant memories.
My first gig was to see Amon Duul in 73(?)who were
touring prior to the release of their Live in London
LP. There were copies of the sleeves in a promo
display in the foyer. As we entered typically they
were getting pinched so I helped myself to one. Later
inside the band were sitting by the side of the stage
and I offered the sleeve to them to sign. I was asked
where I had managed to get the sleeve from as the LP
hadn't been released yet !! Anyway they signed the
sleeve which I've still got.
I also saw Hawkwind on their tour following the Space
Ritual one and was most disappointed when we were told
that Stacia was ill and not performing. Also remember
there being a few fights with biker types and having
to prop one of my mates up for the whole gig as he was
too pissed !!
It was a big occasion to come over from Buckley with
my mates on the train and visit some of the old record
shops such as Probe and Virgin in Bold Street and
there were some excellent shops in basesments selling
awesome imports.
I used to take my unreliable phillips tape recorder
and record most shows. Unfortunately most recordings
were unlistenable.
I did record the first two Golden Earring shows at the
Stadium. The first was from the first row and is
pretty good. The band were in excellent form and there
was some good banter between Barry Hay and the crowd.
I've now had the recording improved and put onto CD.
I also remember the Virgin all dayer with Gong and
Tubular Bells film and being able to wander around the
back of the stage I'm sure the loos were that way!!
Why did we queue so early?? I saw the Fruupp 75 show
when they were supported by one half of Tir Na Nog -
Sonny Condell( I think)and remember hearing Fruupp
rehearse from outside. Another gig which I still have
a tape of. Although the batteries were running a bit
low by the end as I recorded both - only Fruupp
remains though.
I also saw Be Bop Deluxe and the Drs of Madness. Not
sure if I remember properly but I'm sure Bill Nelson
came out of a big glass like the one on the front of
the Sunburst Finish LP. Anyone else there remember
please.
Lastly I saw Barclay James Harvest nothing unusual to
recall except a brilliant band. That was 74/75 after
the live album.
One final memory was getting caught with my tape
recorder as I walked in. One of the bouncers pulled me
to one side for a few minutes and then let me in with
the recorder.
Anyway great memories and with a couple of souvenirs.
What was the name of the pub next door. It was to the
left as you walked to the Stadium and is it still
there??
Only regrets I've got is not keeping any ticket stubs
and not buying any programmes as keepsakes. There is a
music themed pub in Buckley which has got a framed
collection of tickets with many Stadium ones which I'd
love to get my hands on though.
Best of luck with the site. If your interested in my
two Golden Earring and Fruupp tapes/cd's let me know.
Wouldn't mind swopping for the Hawkwind or any others
you might have.
Please post my email on the site for any like minded
souls to contact me.

Cheers...Mike

Now Julie McColl..Stand up..This is SAD! But I understand ..I really do.
Re-reading my old diaries from 1975 I have just come
across this epic."In the night we went up to the
stadium  [21.6.75] even though nobody was on.We saw
loads of people we knew and shared our 1/4 bottle of
vodka with them [One pound nine pence].Talked for a
bit and then left and got the 17c from the pier head.

Craig is it me or was that sad, going even when nobody
was on and writing how much the vodka was.We must
have had nothing else to do or we had been given some
funny drugs without us knowing.I could never do
anything like that now but DO dream of.

Memories of Roger Eagle from Al Peterson of local R'n'B combo "The Lawnmower"(not really audience but what the hell)

I worked the Stadium with Supercharge and saw many of the greats ie Chuck Berry, Captain Beefheart, Frank Zappa etc

I remember when Roger was involved with Alan Cottam (Supercharge manager at that time) on the Stadium Promotions.
The night in question was when Chuck Berry, patting his trusted enforcer he kept in his inside pocket, and refused to perform unless he had 2000 in cash up front!
Alan C frantically managed to arrange this prior to Chuck's performance dashing around Liverpool in a taxi and with almost disastrous financial consequences, was in such a rush to get the money to Mr Berry and get him onstage on time (as the fans were getting restless), that he left a black briefcase outside the Stadium totally unattended whilst paying the taxi fare and dashing inside.
Honest AL came to the rescue and handed the black briefcase to Roger who couldn't believe it!
I was not aware of the contents until informed by the Eagle who wasn't at all happy on realising what could have been!
He let Alan know in no uncertain terms.
Have you ever experienced a raging Eagle?

Best of luck with the site.

Rgds
AL
(/;-)>

aka
AL Willard Peterson

Peter McDermott sends this message to these pages:-
Not only can I remember the place, I actually worked there.

I probably started going around 1970/71. I was still at school at the time, perhaps 15.

I had a couple of friends -- Mal McGreary, Alan Reason and John Cresswell, and we'd go to every event and try to bunk in -- not just to the Stadium, but to every event in the city. St. Georges Hall, Mountford Hall (at the University), the Empire, the Philharmonic Hall and The Stadium. All hosted rock concerts back in those days.

Anyway, Roger Eagle, who ran the Stadium, got so sick to death of us that he gave us a job. In return for helping the roadies haul in the goods, we'd get in for free. We'd make money by selling hash and acid to the bands on the side. I can still recall getting an ounce for Status Quo, which must have been later period, because I believe I charged them 16, and when I started working there, an ounce of good black only cost a tenner (12 for Gold Seal).

Some of the bands I recall seeing that aren't on your list:

Chuck Berry: who turned up with some nasty old slapper in tow (possibly his wife?) and wouldn't go on stage until he'd had his fee, but gave an outstanding performance.

Captain Beefheart: Twice. Once touring to support 'Spotlight Kid', the second time (when I had to take him to Hessy's to buy strings) touring with 'Clear Spot'.

Nazareth/New York Dolls/Lou Reed. I believe it was the tour after Transformer (which I believe he did at the Top Rank.) Lou wouldn't go on if the Dolls went on before him, so they put a tape into a cheap, 10 portable battery cassette player, stuck a mike in front of the speaker and played that over the PA for 40 minutes. Then Lou came on and did one of the best gigs I ever saw. (I'd seen the Velvets a few years before at the Mountford Hall, but Lou wasn't with them. Touring to promote 'Loaded' and Lou had just quit.

Led Zeppelin. Saw these twice in Liverpool as well. First time, when Led Zep 3 was released and they played the Mountford Hall. Then a year or so later, (possibly for Led Zep 4) when they played the Stadium.

Roxy Music: Who were a supporting act. Don't recall the headliners but it was definitely, the best debut I ever saw.

I was very happy there, until Roger Eagle caught me gulping down a bottle of Dr. Collis Browne's Compound and sacked me on the spot.


From Joan Bimson comes.......LOADS!
Hi there, I'm not sure who I'm writing to, but I've just stumbled on your
wonderful site!
I was a stadium regular from the early 70s until it's demise.My first
concert was T.Rex in 1971, but then I saw Hawkwind umpteen times, and used
to arrive early on a gig day to queue and watch the gear come in! (only
other regulars would understand the thrill of it!) My first, and most
dramatic (or messy anyway) drinking bouts were on the stadium steps. Never
had a very strong stomach for booze since then - but still practising!

I should explain who I am. My name's Joan Bimson, and I used to come over
from Southport. I had difficulty persuading girlfriends to come over with me
(I always had a rather butch taste in music!) and eventually plucked up the
courage to come on my own. I remember the date of my first solo gig; it was
april 7th, 1973 - Captain Beefheart's magic band. From then on I made
friends, and eventually made the coffee for the stage crew. I thought it was
great! Running errands and mopping floors and getting in for nothing! Seems
very naive now in my cynical later years, but it was so much fun!

I think I remember Dave Roberts, but I definately remember Tosh!

I palled up with a girl from Eastham called Cris Matthews, and my later
concert going years were usually with her. She emigrated to Australia, and I
saw her for the first time in about 15 years a little while ago. The first
thing we did was go to the stadium site. In my memory, the place was huge,
and the site just didn't seem big enough, however it will always be huge in
my mind's eye!

I always look out for stadium veterans around Liverpool, and I've even
spotted a few, but never plucked up the courage to introduce myself! I don't
think I've changed that much - though I'd be gutted if someone else thought
so!

Inspired by many of the bands I saw there, I went on to become a musician
(bassist) for many years. I stopped playing in 97 and did a degree in
Liverpool. I'm doing a PhD here now and a little lecturing.

Be great to catch up with other regulars,
best wishes,
Joan.

Tim Jones recalls:-
My first ever (proper) gig I attended was Hawkwind at The Stadium on January 18th 1975 when I was just 14 years old!
About fifteen of us arrived via Coach from Fflint, North Wales.  There was a pub nearby (St.Paul's ??)
and some older Hawkwind heads took our hard-earned paper-round money to purchase some ale for us.
The support act was a black singer named Al Mathews who did his best (bless him) to fire up the crowd- he got the best cheer when he later took to the stage to jam on the congas with Hawkwind!!
I was in the second row from the front and one of the strangest memories was when a troll like figure slumped next to me and said "Got any Acid?"- Holy Shit! I thought- he's going to throw sulphuric acid at the band!  Amazing how you quietly learn from people around you.....

One of the things I'll never forget, is that Lemmy had a faulty lead to his Bass Guitar, which was swapped mid-set by a hapless roadie for a more reliable one while Lemmy was in full throttle and he didn't notice!
I saw Barclay James Harvest, I wasn't a fan of their stuff, but went along anyway.
They were supported by a chap named Julian Brook who banged out his ditties on a Piano ("Said The Major!!!" - I guess you had to be there!) and suffered a torrent of abuse from the audience, I remember someone throwing a soggy baguette of ham salad and it landing on the Piano keys....

I saw Fruupp, the Irish Prog band, they were okay, but the one I really enjoyed, almost as much as Hawkwind, was Be-Bop Deluxe supported by The Doctors of Madness.
As we stood in THAT queue outside, The Doctors were near their touring van- an old bedford job I think, Richard 'Kid' Strange turned to our young frames and asked "What the f**k have you come to see these teenyboppers for ?"- obviously referring to Be Bop Deluxe, we were too stunned/shy to reply- especially as he had bright blue hair!.
When the Doctors took to the stage, they were electrifying!!  I even purchased their silver flexi-disc which they were hawking at their gigs around that time.
It's strange how music then changed with the advent of 'Punk'- but I'll remember the Doctors as already 'being there' as it were.
Although I didn't attend many gigs there, I still feel great having been to one of the great past venues of the 1970s!

I know it's not much- but I hope this will add to your great website-

PLEASE ENTER..THE LIVERPOOL STADIUM..ITS ROCK TIME !!!!!!

THE AUDIENCE REMEMBERS(a contradiction in terms)

HOME PAGE | More of Eds work | EDs PAGE | CHRISTMAS REUNION | REUNION 2009 | REVIEWS | GONE TO THE "OTHER REALM" | GLYN HAZELDENs Memories and photos | THE LAST TRUMPET | YOU LOT | MORE PEOPLE | EVEN MORE | LATEST ADDITIONS | ROB DOBIES TULL PHOTOS | GREASY TRUCKERS 2002 | BAND PHOTOS . | MORE of OTHER STUFF | OH NO...MORE OTHER STUFF! | EXTRA OTHER STUFF | AND THERES MORE | BITS 'N' BOBS ! | STADIUM 2012 !! ?? | GIG LIST | MIND BLOWN | MIND BLOWN...STARTS | LINKS | TICKETS | TICKETS PAGE 2 | OTHER STUFF | WHAT THE ARTISTS THOUGHT | ANOTHER PAGE OF MORE STUFF | CHRISTMAS 2010

Jane Brideson now esconsed in Eire sent this message:-
Hi - I came across your site the other night - I couldn't believe there was a site about the Stadium & us!
Like everyone who's written I was taken back to the music, the people, the smells and the Cross Keys.
I started going to the Stadium in 72 I think, when I was about 15 and used to collect all the tickets and programmes but they were lost
in various moves over the years. The gigs that stand out clearly are the Hawkwind Space Ritual, Can, Zappa, Groundhogs & Tull.
There were loads more but most have got lost in a haze of something or other................
I also think I saw Atomic Rooster, ELP & Strawbs - at the Empire or Court maybe?
Zep I saw at Earls Court in 75 as I missed them at the Stadium.
Other memories of the place are the pasties, the queue outside, Wally and the great feeling as we left and walked down to the Pierhead to get the bus home.

Back then I was Jane McGill (I'm the one in black in the 1st pic) and part of the Holly Lodge crowd - Joy Howarth, Di Johnson, Di Barlow, Sue Madine &
Val Monahan . Others were - Steve O'Brian, Bill Whittaker, Bill Dibble, Steve Draper, Roger Winterburn, & Graham 'Cromby'.
I also remember Tosh, Steve Hirtell, Macca, Phil Jurek, Chris? Sharrock & Geoff Pinnington.

Have attached the only pics I have left, sadly none of the Stadium itself.
Don't know who took them or if you can use them?

Reading people's memories brought back so many places I'd forgotten - Silly Billys, Probe and a guy called Ian? with long blond hair who sold
joss sticks, candles and stuff downstairs. He used to have cushions on the floor where you could sit for as long as you wanted.
And the Post Office, the Crack, the Phil, O'Connors, Virgin and the Moonstone.
I can't remember the bands I saw at the Moony - was AC DC there?

These days I live in the Republic of Ireland in an old cottage surrounded by fields and cows.
I'm an artist with a shed as a studio at the bottom of the garden & I still listen to all the good stuff there that I first
heard at the Stadium back in the 70's. Looking back it was an amazing place to be............

Thank you for this great site & I really appreciate the work you've done.
I'm still in contact with a couple of the others so will let them know about it.
If anyone remembers me feel free to pass on my address.

Best wishes
Jane
 

Hi,

My name is Richie Fisher, I'm 51 and live in New Brighton.

Many thanks for creating this brilliant site, it brings back so many happy memories!

I have attached some photos of tickets, and a photo of me at the time.  Please note that the Curved Air ticket has been autographed on the rear.  Three of us waited ages after the gig to try and get Sonia's autograph as they left.  However, we were invited upstairs(?) as I remember it, into their dressing room.  I came over all 'star-struck' and whilst shaking Francis Monkman's hand blurted out "Well Done!" too loudly which caught every one's attention!  As a hormonal teenager, I really wanted Sonia's autograph which I managed to get!

I went to so many concerts at the Stadium and elsewhere and feel so privileged to have experienced the vibrant music scene at that time.  I remember queueing overnight outside the Empire for Yes and ELP tickets.

You are missing a gig on your gig list...... I went to see Gentle Giant on 13th December 1975 at the Stadium, and this can be confirmed by typing Gentle Giant gig lists into Google and scrolling to 1975.

I look forward to reading more stuff in the future and keep up the good work!

Richie

From Robin..A late one here..Sorry

An old friend of mine just told me about the site – melting memories coalesce in a cosmic now – I thought I was the only person on Earth that remembers “Time Captives” (I managed to get a copy of the CD from ‘Hippy Shake Records’ in Helsinki). My first Stadium gig was Sabbath in ‘71(?) and after that I used to go every week, if it was a band I liked that was a bonus. Experienced the Space Ritual full of sunshine (wearing a space helmet and a purple cloak, if that rings any bells with anyone), and generally loved every tie-dyed, patchouli-sodden minute of it. Years later I worked for Royal Insurance on Old Hall Street and used to go to the Cross Keys at lunch time (this was after the stadium became a car park) it was so depressing to see that place full of suits. So depressing in fact that I abandoned IT consultancy and started a degree course in English Literature, grew my hair long again (at least at the back and sides) and bought a t-shirt with a picture of a mushroom on it. Scouring ebay for an Afghan coat.

“Do Not Panic”

Rob Dobie says...Having been to dozens of gigs at the Liverpool stadium I thought you`d like a photograph of the great Rory Gallagher`s gig in June 1972.This was the famous gig were  Roxy Music made a hasty retreat from the stage as the audience wanted Nazareth and Rory.Other concerts I saw which I did`nt see on your gig list were ;
John Mayall, Eggs Over Easy.
Heads Hands & Feet,Vinegar Joe( with Robert Palmer & Elkie Brooks)Bronco.
Family,America.
Peace who supported Mott The Hoople had Paul Rogers as their lead singer.The most memorable gigs for me were the many Rory Gallagher played.The venue was tailor made for Rory.I have some photographs of the Jethro Tull gig from 1973 which I`ll send as soon as possible.On the down side of things the food bar sold the worst food ever cooked (if it ever was).
Great memories
Rob Dobie ( ex Speke and now Runcorn)
 

Bill Drummond kindly contributed this ( Please dont copy it its copyright ok )
 

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BRUTALITY, RELIGION AND A DANCE BEAT
A SHORT STORY by Bill Drummond


October 1975, I was 22 and back in Liverpool, after a two year absence. Just started a new job, building stage sets at the Everyman Theatre on Hope Street. I had a room at the top of a rundown house in Fairfield Street off Prescot Road. Shared the kitchen and bathroom with a Karl Terry. Karl Terry had a band called The Cruisers. They also lived in the house. Karl Terry and The Cruisers were also-rans in the Mersey Beat boom of the early sixties. Not only was Karl Terry fuelled with a bitterness that he was not John Lennon, but Karl Terry and The Cruisers were not even The Searchers, The Swinging Blue Jeans or Gerry and the Pacemakers. This meant they were not able to make a lucrative living on the Mersey Beat nostalgia package tours that had been going ever since the genre had outstayed its Hitsville welcome.

Karl Terry and his Cruisers eked out a living playing working-men's clubs across Merseyside. He also regaled me late into the nights about what an arsehole John Lennon was and what a crap live band The Beatles were.

At 22 I had long since lost any interest I may have had in contemporary pop. It was the arse end of progressive and glam held no interest for me. I was just too old for all that stuff.

Each weekday morning I got the number 78 into work. I was still young enough for the top-deck front seat to be my one of choice.

One Monday morning I found a bundle of magazines on the seat next to me. The first thing I noticed about the magazine was the word FREE on the cover. Back then the world was not awash with giveaway papers, magazines and periodicals stuffed with meaningless adverts and column inches full of shit that nobody reads.

Back then for something to be free was a radical statement. Almost like burning the Stars and Stripes or smashing down the gates of the Bastille.

The only other words on the cover other than FREE were Trumpet, Last and The. If The Last Trumpet was the name of this magazine it was the best name for a magazine I had ever heard. It instantly resonated with something deep and lost. A clarion call from the edge of time.

Looking round first to make sure no fellow travellers thought I was nicking one of these free Last Trumpets, I picked up a copy. On opening it up I was disappointed to find that it was not packed with revolutionary rhetoric, there was no call to arms, it was just stuff about local bands, adverts for record shops and gig lists. Then I turned to the back cover. This was taken up by a black and white photo of a man who looked and dressed like he had just escaped from the high-security ward of a mental hospital. Whatever this man was or did he was my instant hero. The intense and demented stare, the crap haircut, the bad suit all screamed "I am Legend, worship only me." And I did. Under the picture was one word WILKO. What this word referred to I had no clear understanding.

On arriving at the Everyman Theatre that Monday morning, I showed one of the actors this Last Trumpet magazine and asked him if he knew who or what Wilko was. The actor was called William Nighy and he knew about such things.

"Where have you been, Bill? That's Wilko Johnson, the guitarist with Doctor Feelgood." "What, a British band?"

"Yeah, from Canvey Island, Southend. They are playing at the Liverpool Stadium tonight. We're all going. You wanna come?"

I went, but by myself. I didn't like going out with other people. The Liverpool Stadium was a pre-war indoor boxing stadium. It was down some backstreets north of the old Exchange Station. Not a residential area: industrial mills, bonded warehouses and a severe lack of street lighting.

The queue to get in was five deep and at least a couple of hundred yards long. I joined the back. Things had obviously changed since I had last been to a rock concert some four years earlier. Gone were the loon pants and waft of patchouli oil. Gone was the pseudo West Coast peace and love vibe. Punch ups kept erupting in the queue as youths tried to push in or shove those in front. The dress code seemed strict and decidedly downbeat: dark anoraks or tracksuit tops, straight leg jeans, trainers and short haircuts with lank fringes. A large man with a bright red shirt and black trousers appeared on the steps that led up to the doors of the Stadium. He must have been six foot four and he must have been in at least his mid- thirties. He was a figure of natural authority. His mere appearance quelled whatever punch ups were erupting.

"Any more of that and none of you get in and I don't care if you've already got tickets." Silence fell and order was regained.

Inside the Stadium the atmosphere was equally oppressive. Drab paintwork, little house-lighting. The P.A. and band gear were set up on the boxing ring rise, the back half of the hall was partitioned off. There was a woman selling hot dogs and hamburgers from a kiosk. Everyone seemed to know she was called Doreen. "Go on, Doreen, more mustard than that." She represented the only ray of femininity in the whole place.

The walls were covered in faded and torn bills advertising past and future fights.

The house lights went down and the support band came on stage. They were fronted by an American in glasses who looked like a chunky Jewish Buddy Holly. His band played a loose, stuttering and jazz kind of boogie.

The crowd didn't like it, but instead of talking about the football or some bird they almost shagged, they en masse decided to let the Jewish Buddy Holly and his band know how they felt.

The band I learnt were called Roogalator and they were not for giving into the crowd's displeasure. They carried on with their lazy southern boogie shuffle thing. The crowd took to more radical measures to make their point known. They started to smash up the wooden tip-up seats and hurl them towards the stage. Most didn't reach that far, but hit the back of the heads of other disgruntled punters. This then caused fighting to erupt between those near the front and those further back. By now, nobody was taking any notice if Roogalator were still grooving on stage.

Then suddenly a great booming voice filled the Stadium. "Right, that's it. You can all go home. I've had enough of your pathetic behaviour. I bring to Liverpool the best working bands around for you and this is how you show your appreciation. Well, you can forget coming to the Stadium for any further shows because I'm going to cancel them all."

The place fell silent. It was that big man with the red shirt and black trousers again. I asked the lad next to me "Who is that man?"

"You don't know? That man is Roger Eagle, the greatest man on Merseyside after Bill Shankley."

Roogalator played three further songs, not a sound from the audience, not a jeer or a clap. After the third, they left the stage to complete silence.

Fifteen minutes later, four ugly convicts sauntered onto the stage, picked up their sticks, Fender Precision, mike and Telecaster respectively, someone counted to four and the place erupted. What I witnessed over the next sixty minutes may have been the greatest rock'n'roll event ever on earth. Fuck all that Woodstock shit, this was the real thing. Wilko, the guitarist, was everything and more his picture on the back of The Last Trumpet had promised. He was the ultimate guitar hero for a decade that so far had only delivered bollocks like Steve Howe as a blueprint for young hopefuls to follow.

I was one of the last to leave the Stadium. 1 just wanted to stand there, stare at the smashed up seats, the ripped boxing bills and roadies clearing the stage and try to work out what was happening and why I had had to wait since 1969 for whatever it was to start happening.

I went back to my room in Fairfield Street thinking maybe I should start playing guitar again. Karl Terry and his band had just got in from doing a gig up in Bootle. They were chopping out lines of coke on the kitchen table. It was the first time I saw someone sniff cocaine. Suddenly that line about a ten bob note up your nose made sense. I'd led a sheltered life.

I tried to explain to Karl what I had witnessed at the Liverpool Stadium. He didn't want to know. He was too full of the fact that they might get the opening slot on the upcoming Billy J. Kramer Australian tour.

A thousand rock journalists have tried to define that thing the Feelgoods had for those barren months that led up to the punk onslaught of late '76. By the time the onslaught hit, Doctor Feelgood were irrelevant. Their job had been done. Rock'n'roll Lesson Number 7 - all success is on borrowed time.

A year or so after seeing Doctor Feelgood at the Stadium, that man called Roger Eagle opened a club on Mathew Street opposite to where the Cavern had been. The club was called Eric's. Via Eric's he turned a Liverpool generation on to a weird and wonderful world of strange records and the possibility of making even stranger ones. But all of that is another story better told by others.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yesterday afternoon I learnt that Roger Eagle had died of cancer. Plenty of people die but Roger never seemed like he was going to be one of them. No, Roger don't die, he wouldn't allow it. Whatever else may go by the wayside Roger Eagle carries on. There is always another club for him to open, concert to promote, record to buy. My mind filled with a memory. The memory was of me sitting on a chair in a flat off Lark Lane in Liverpool and pacing around the room was a large man in a red shirt and black trousers. The man exhaled clouds of smoke before taking another toke from the giant spliff in his hand. Behind the man was a wall of shelves stuffed with albums and reggae 12" 45s. It was August 1977. The man was Roger Eagle and he was the manager of the band I was in, Big In Japan.

"But, Roger, why have you called our record 'Brutality, Religion And A Dance Beat'? That's got nothing to do with us."

"Bill, if it hasn't it should have; without those three ingredients pop music is nothing. All great pop music, from John Lee Hooker to the Bay City Rollers, from Captain Beefheart to Augustus Pablo, from the Buzzcocks to Johnny Kidd And The Pirates has it. 'Brutality, Religion And A Dance Beat', it's rock'n'roll; rule number one, and don't forget it.

"But the cover looks shit, Roger."

"Fuck off, Bill, I got work to do. Shouldn't you go and rehearse or something?"

For some, there was rather a quaint notion that the size of a man's record collection was somehow symbolic of his size in other departments. Whether this was ever openly articulated at the time I'm not sure.

Roger Eagle had the biggest record collection I had ever seen.

I'm sitting in my workroom at home. I've just looked up at the clock - 18 minutes past two. The funeral service started at two. They will all be there, the Normans, the Bernies, the Steve Hardstaffs, maybe not the ones that got to the cover of the NME, but the ones that counted. The ones that understood. The ones that had to put up with the pig ignorance, the arrogance and even the bullying of Roger. And, of course, Doreen, she'll be there.

Roger Eagle was never bothered about being a record producer or going to London and making it big as a wheeler dealer in the music business. Roger was a record collector first and foremost. What he was driven to do above all was play people records they had never heard before. "Listen to this Bill, Bo Diddley meets Beefheart at the Black Ark produced by Lee 'Scratch' Perry, the greatest record ever made" - and it probably would have been if it ever had.

In many senses that record collection was the man, or at least in my head stands as a perfect symbol of the man.

An idea presents itself. Roger's record collection should not be sold off piecemeal by his executors to pay off funeral bills and whatever debts he may have left behind. I should use some of the cash that came my way and never would have if he had not existed and put an offer in for the collection.

A towering cabinet could be made from iron or oak or concrete or granite, whatever feels right to encase the collection.

It could stand like the monolith at the beginning of Kubrick's 2001, shelf upon shelf of worn grooves and dog-eared sleeves, a monument to the man. A monument in a public space that we can walk around and admire its size, its girth. Those records' playing days would be over. No needle should ever touch their grooves again. Without Roger there to play them to you, they would lose their meaning. You may as well just get the CD box set down your local HMV or Virgin.

Tonight I will make some phone calls, see what can be done. Of course I could be wrong. Maybe my idea is just me jerking off - "Look at me, Bill Drummond, didn't I do well for myself" - as I wave my diminishing wad at the thinning crowd.

 

Bill Drummond, May 1999

 

This Pamphlet is published specifically for those bullied by the life and work of Roger Eagle.

pb

Published by the Penkiln Burn

 

PAMPHLET THREE

 
 

Hi Tosh.
Long time no see. Dan Donovan calling from sunny Ashton in Makerfield. I don't live in garswood any more.
My Bro' Eamon told me about your rock years site and I've had a trawl through it this evening. Well done mate! Its very good and has brought back some powerfull memories of my more formative years. It's good to see that you and young Mr Roberts are still kicking it. Are you in touch with any others? I'd love to know what people are up to. I was saddened finding out that Bano had passed, not least because David Ellis and Ivvy Healings daughter Beccy (my wife Nicky is Ivvy's sister) is still in touch with Carole and visits her regularly in Scotland. She has never mentioned it but we don't see her that often unfortunately. (Dave Ellis has now got 2 grandchildren. How old does that make you feel!) I was even more upset to learn that Suz has also gone. What happened to them? I used to be good mates with Suz but we fell out over I don't know what and it all became stupidly acrimonious and ended up with us having handbags at half eleven in the Sphinx bar at mountford hall. I have wondered what happened to him from time to time over the years and unfortunately, now I know.
I was impressed at your powers of recall but...... There are a number of significant characters missing from your role call who certainly deserve to be mentioned and without who, the whole thing would not have been half the experience it was. The Stadium Stage crew (Dave Backhouse, Me, Bob Goggin, Steve O'Brien, Robbie with the very long hair and even longer fingernails and others who came and went and who I can't remember without sitting and thinking about it.) We used to turn up on a Friday night and if we were lucky, watch the wrestling and have a couple of pints in the keys with Mick McManus or Les kellet before skinning up furiously and building the stage overnight. Alan Frost (The Regal Eagle's rock and roll bouncer. A really top guy who looked like he had just escaped from Sha-Na-Na and who's bark was bad but really he was a great bloke) 80 odd year old Johnnie (an ex-boxer who sat in the ticket office all day and could still hit you 3 or 4 times before you could bring your guard up) and Mick the security who used to pay me 5 to lock up after the concerts had finished and then go to the pub about 8-30. It was seriously scarey being in there on your own, especially as the light switches were all over the place inside the stadium, not in the foyer. Linford Christie would have struggled to catch me some nights as I raced for the exit before the weed induced paranoia kicked in.
you also havent mentioned any of the Holly Lodge (Diane Johnson, Diane Barlow, Joy Howarth, Denise Woods) or Prescot grammar girls (Scrag, Wez, Laurel Dailey, Bernie Verey, Barbera Smith and Arfa's nicole who, I seem to remember was involved in an altercation with Wez involving beer and Arfa's cowboy boot) the Netherly crew (Joey Williams and Barbera, Graham, Phil etc) or Haggis, Jeanette (nog) Fitzhugh and loads of others
It's late now and I have work in the morning so I will finish here. Drop me a line and I'll trawl through the memory bank for some nuggets for you.
Two last things. Do you know whatever happened to TC (Timothy Charles Baker if I remember correctly) and I think the girl on the left of the photo with TC and who Dave appears to be ogling is Karen Monk.
Cheers Mate.
these are all off the cuff personal memories, so please don't post them until I have had a chance to reflect and if neccessary, edit them.
hear from you soon I hope
Dan 

 Dave Crilly sent this in :-Hiya Mate,

I couldn't believe the site when a friend pointed it out to me. Well done! I thought I'd share a few of my thoughts and memories...

I was a regular to the Stadium gigs with a bunch of mates from sunny Birkenhead. My name's Dave Crilly and I used to go there with Kev (Macca), Shaun (Coll) and Tim (Mozzy). I remember the first gig I saw there (or anywhere for that matter) was Black Sabbath (with Wild Turkey in support). If memory serves the tickets cost 12 shillings!!! I think over that period we must have seen every great band going... Deep Purple, Gentle Giant, Hawkwind (almost every week, it seemed), Mott the Hoople (supported by a band called Queen... I wonder what happened to them) and Uriah Heep. I remember me, Shaun and Kev getting in to 'roadie' for Uriah Heep and I got to play Mick Box's guitar... I played 'The Wizard' and thought I was great!!

We used to arrive very early in the morning to get the best seats and just sit on the steps waiting for the St.Paul's to open (the Cross Keys was a bit up-market for us, as none of us owned a purple velvet jacket!!) Bitter in the St.Paul's was 15p a pint... unless we were noisy - then it went up to 16 or 17p. But the most abiding memory of all has to be the Stadium goddess... Joan Bimson, who led me astray one glorious afternoon, but then didn't turn up to meet me under the statue at Lewis' the following Monday. Talk about rites of passage... I was a broken man after that!!!  : - )

Great site... many thanks for prompting those memories! Keep up the good work.

I've enclosed a photo of me taken in 1975.

cheers

Dave Crilly

Thanks to Steve Power for suggesting this (ex Bad Rabbit-see link)

 
Sally Sutton says:-
I came across your website today and it brought back loads of memories.  I used to be part of the “catering” team whenever Roger Eagle promoted a concert.  Pete Savage and I and a bunch of friends would start early on a Saturday morning making sandwiches then pack everything into an old transit van.  We would turn up at the Stadium early evening and set up the hot dogs and sandwiches at the back.  I saw so many wonderful bands through a haze of hot dog steam (well, that’s my story and I’m sticking to it).  This was from late 69 early 70 onwards.  Memories, apart from all the incredible music?  Roger, larger than life, safe, warm.  ? seller of IT. Chicken lip pies in the pub at the back.  Mott the Hoople parties.  Visits to the Glark mines on the way home.

Two memories from Steve Power:-
I saw Jethro Tull at the LS on 19th March 1973 and the cue went almost all the way around the building!

When I saw Steve Harley and Cockney Rebel there (can't remember the year) there was a fire (I think it was a false alarm) and the whole audience was sent outside for about 20 minutes. When we got back in, the band started from exactly where they had left off in the set!



From Steve Greenall:-
. I did see my first ever gig at the Stadium, though...Roy Wood's Wizzard, circa 1973, swiftly followed by AC/DC's first ever tour. As Angus was being branded as the obnoxious school kid even then, in about 1974, I took up the challenge of wearing my Prescot Grammar School cap and tie, and whilst I didn't make the grand final of the AC/DC school kid competition, held at Hammersmith Apollo, merely getting togged up for the Stadium gig ensured an album as a prize, and I won a copy of Alice Cooper's Muscle of Love.

Charlie Thorpe just about remembers :-
Just  found this site, bloody 'ell what memories (actually , truth is I hardly remember most of the bands I saw at the stadium,cough!).
Born in "55" so I'd be about 15 when I saw my first band at the stadium, it was "AMERICA".  Some memorial moments that seem to stick in my mind are:
ZAPPA & the encore shouting
FREE, god it was heaving in there that night, condensation was running down the back wall in rivers.
MOTT THE HOOPLES/ ROCK N ROLL CIRCUS & Max Wall enduring the crowd.
JETHRO TULL, they stopped playing & announced that a horse was causing trouble in the foyer, a bloke walked past the stage in full jockey colours, then they carried on where they left off.
THE FACES, always a great band, Lewisis store had a model of the band  under a glass dome.
RORY GALLAGHER, goin' to my hometown!!!!!
LED ZEPP, what a band, funny enough my son plays a lot of their stuff these days, it'll stay till the end of time.
THE SMELL of the place, if only you could bottle it .
THE CROSS KEYS, served anyone & everyone, whatever condition you were in!
THE MATCHBOX, the tiny pub round the corner.
ANYWAY....... there must have been trouble sometime but I never found it, the other venues never matched the STADIUMS presence, maybe it was a terrible place accoustically but the atmoshere in there was electric.  Bands don't play venues that size anymore 'cause of the money issues, shame really 'cause it's personal & magic.
If you think about The STADIUM attracted what would be classed as "STADIUM" bands these days,
irony of it all!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

CHARLIE the Wirral
great site cheers, I'll pass it on
ps AND VIRGIN RECORDS IN BOLD STREET!!!


David Bowen commented:-
I was at the Free concert in '71. As I remember it was Mott the Hoople who supported - a great gig from both bands, especially the late and great Paul Kossof.


Andy Lovelady submits this (anyone heard of this before?):-
A work colleague advised me today that on a recent documentary Dave Hill out
of Slade claimed to have fallen off his silly shoes and broke his ankle at
the stadium .
Now confirmed by Jon Kirkman,see guestbook entry.

Dave Orrett comes up with:-
First concert we ever went to was Status Quo/ Savoy Brown in '73. One hell of an eye opener, it was like being in a totally different world (well it was compared to Kirkby!). 15 years old and there we were fresh from Ruffwood surrounded by all these guys totally flaked out wondering what was up with them, we couldn't work out whether they were enjoying themselves or not.

Saw Robin Trower, must have been '75 with my sister and a mate from school in the same year as her. She spent most of the time complaining that she couldn't see. So we'd push her up on the wooden divider that ran along the walkways, every time we got her up a bouncer/ security guard whould come along and tell her to get down. I bought some joss sticks that night, my great coat stunk for months afterwards.

Two things, why no mention of the Cross Keys? It was always the first stop off after we got off the 92B

Also does anyone know the whereabouts of my white bush hat, it had a pile of embroidery on my mum did, including a fine Hawkwind eagle. I lost it in the Stadium somewhere.

Message from Paul Adams....
Just surfing and found your site. I was a student at Durham between 1970 & 1973 but had a girlfriend in Liverpool who I visited regularly(she was at the Uni) and each of my visits seemed to coincide with a visit to the Stadium. I remember seeing Mountain on a Wednesday(Best concert I ever saw) followed by Free on the Saturday. Other acts I saw there included Rory Gallagher, Deep Purple, John Mayall, Bad Company, Nazareth etc. Favourite memories include Roxy Music being booed off stage as backing band to Rory Gallagher. Least favourite memory turning up to a Faces concert to find it had been cancelled.
I am presuming it now no longer exists, typical another place of fond memory gone. What happened to it and when ?
"There are places I remember, some have gone and some remain"
Anyway thanks for the site even if it has made me nostalgically depressed. Keep it going.

Paul Adams
(Editors Note..excellent quote for the site home page there Borrowed from the Beatles)

 Mike Windmill??(well I may be wrong!) has these memories including one of dear old "WALLY!"
What a brillant site - I spent my youth growing up in the LS - my 1st ever
gig was Hawkwind on space ritual tour - last was the AC/DC concert when
things got wrecked!

Funniest memory - Keith Christmas offering to take the crowd on single handed
when he got booed off - best must be the Gong gigs (especially at 44p!).

Other good memories - Supercharge - the Tangs - Can + 100's more!

1st time I got legless was on a 2ltr bottle of argie white - follwed by a
pint of guiness in pub round courner - they were happy to serve a 14 year old
without any questions (what was that pub called??).  1st time I got stoned
was helping Hawkwind roadies in with gear - they passed round interesting
herbal remedies - and also bought us some of those really nice french sticks
they used to sell inside.

Anyway - have loads more memories - just not the time at the moment to recall
them for you - WALLY!!!

Hey..A diary memory.This is superb and in the true spirit of this site!
Saturday June 28th 1975 {aged 15 }
   ''In the night we decided to go to the stadium,but
not to go in {cos it was 80p and we can't stand Ronnie
Lane},but to sit on the steps. So we went down and
first of all just walked round. We sat outside and we
later went to the Keys. We saw kieth Humphreys who was
stoned then the police landrover moved us on. Sat on
the steps and Rob came to tell us that Tommy {Myers}
had been taken to the pig station for being drunk and
disorderly and underage. Then Neil came over and let
us in by opening  the door and handing us two
tickets.Dad met us in exchange station.''
Julie Mccoll

Dave Padgett remembers.......stuff I remember too.!

I always remember that whilst the kids were freaking out at the front there
was a lonely figure (?a caretaker?) up at the top of the disused half of the
stadium dispassionately sucking on either a roll up or a woodbine in the
half light

I remember a brilliant  Wisbone Ash gig from the same tour that "Live Dates"
was culled.I also remember a brilliant Dr Feelgood gig (with Wilco Johnson)

Bad Companies first tour

I think that my own personal favourite was the 6 hour concert with Global
Village Trucking Co/Hatfield and the North (my favourites) and Gong

ROB DODGSON sent me this....
When there was a big act on, we used to get to the Stadium early in the morning after staying up all night in the pub that my mate lived in (very convenient). All day we would sit on the steps and gloat that we would get the best place down by the stage. (Standing within inches of Deep Purple's PA, pumping out 120 decibels certainly wrecked my hearing and brain cells). The vigil at the front of the queue would only be interupted by trips for food and to the Cross Keys (and the St Pauls around the corner when we were barred from the 'Keys) for well earned liquid refreshment. I was born in 1958, so you can see that I was at an impressionable age at this time - I was very impressed!!
 
Occasionally, I did help out by helping to put the stage up etc, and thus gain free admission (I was still at school). I mat Rory Gallagher this way. He walked in with his mandoli under his arm, looking around and wondering why nobody would come over to him and make a fuss. After about 10 minutes and feeling sorry for him, I went over to talk to him - nice guy.
 
It became a way of life, attending the Stadium whenever I could. When there were no bands on, we used to go to the Moonstone in the Precinct. I remember going to the opening night of the Back of the Moon Club the night before an exam. To make it worse, I had to walk home to Kirkdale as by the time we staggered out, the buses had all gone to bed.
 
I have rediscovered an old mate from school through your site (Dave "the skull" Williams). We were in the same class at the Collegiate and attended the Stadium together. I got his email address from your guestbook.
 
I'll have a think of some of the concerts and dig around some other sources for information . (What concert did they show a film of Led Zep's Trampled Underfoot?)
 

A memory from The Bano(how??)

.....yeah..... I remember nothing about most gigs, as by about 4.00pm I was usually off my box......but I do vaguely recall a standing ovation for Frank Zappa that lasted for an eternity......the band refused to do an encore.....and the crowd refused to leave...........until (I think) the cops arrived.............hmmmm.......did anyone ever find Wally?

Rediscovered your Stadium site via Wikipedia. I contacted you some years back re. pix i had of Bad Company, I had no scanner at time and friend failed to forward. However, I digress.  I cannot promise posting immediately, but I shall forward any Stadium related material I find. I have yet to really absorb site , but just browsing the dates I found many very specific memories flooding back (eg getting horrendous cramp in thighs, after earlier playing football, during Alquins set 13-6-74, and my first Stadium gig 14/02/74 BJH.....support incidently by a male soloist on acoustic guitar, sorry, no name !  )
 
        Misc. dates/bands I have in my " Gig Book"..... Blythe Spirit support to Bad Co on 14/02/74...you have it listed as Darien Spirit.   19/10/75 Dr. Feelgood (sell out....sold "pass out" ticket for full value after one hour, then got chased to Pier Head by police trying to climb back in through toilet window !!!!!!!  )           Lol Coxhill, Still Life &  Edgar Broughton band  I have as 28/08/74, not 28/09 ????          08/11/75 Edgar Broughton band     6/12/75 Judas Priest (Rob Halford with hair down to his ass !!!  )    I have a Jess Roden Band date uncertain, but maybe 13/03/75        15/09/76  Lone Star/ Ted Nugent    9/11/75  additional support to Thin Lizzy....Slack Alice
 
      All the other dates I attended tally with your info. I hope this has been some help to you. Anything questionable I shall try and confirm.  Great site.
 
 
     Best Wishes     Myke  (Bebington, Wirral)
 
 
  PS....28/02/76 I sold my ticket for the Stadium , Bebop Deluxe I think, as I had ticket to see T.Rex at New Brighton.
            
             Saw Nazareth last year at Pacific Road, I thought they were excellent (previously saw them at stadium with Gary Holton & HMK
 
            Only this week. purchased Camembert Electrique  (Gong) on CD ...loving it. Happy memories of the memorable 44pence all dayer

Mike Artell offers these memories:-
Hi

Just found the Stadium website thanks to a friend.
Certainly conjours up some brilliant memories.
My first gig was to see Amon Duul in 73(?)who were
touring prior to the release of their Live in London
LP. There were copies of the sleeves in a promo
display in the foyer. As we entered typically they
were getting pinched so I helped myself to one. Later
inside the band were sitting by the side of the stage
and I offered the sleeve to them to sign. I was asked
where I had managed to get the sleeve from as the LP
hadn't been released yet !! Anyway they signed the
sleeve which I've still got.
I also saw Hawkwind on their tour following the Space
Ritual one and was most disappointed when we were told
that Stacia was ill and not performing. Also remember
there being a few fights with biker types and having
to prop one of my mates up for the whole gig as he was
too pissed !!
It was a big occasion to come over from Buckley with
my mates on the train and visit some of the old record
shops such as Probe and Virgin in Bold Street and
there were some excellent shops in basesments selling
awesome imports.
I used to take my unreliable Phillips tape recorder
and record most shows. Unfortunately most recordings
were unlistenable.
I did record the first two Golden Earring shows at the
Stadium. The first was from the first row and is
pretty good. The band were in excellent form and there
was some good banter between Barry Hay and the crowd.
I've now had the recording improved and put onto CD.
I also remember the Virgin all dayer with Gong and
Tubular Bells film and being able to wander around the
back of the stage I'm sure the loos were that way!!
Why did we queue so early?? I saw the Fruupp 75 show
when they were supported by one half of Tir Na Nog -
Sonny Condell( I think)and remember hearing Fruupp
rehearse from outside. Another gig which I still have
a tape of. Although the batteries were running a bit
low by the end as I recorded both - only Fruupp
remains though.
I also saw Be Bop Deluxe and the Drs of Madness. Not
sure if I remember properly but I'm sure Bill Nelson
came out of a big glass like the one on the front of
the Sunburst Finish LP. Anyone else there remember
please.
Lastly I saw Barclay James Harvest nothing unusual to
recall except a brilliant band. That was 74/75 after
the live album.
One final memory was getting caught with my tape
recorder as I walked in. One of the bouncers pulled me
to one side for a few minutes and then let me in with
the recorder.


Yes you heard right I AM THE BUM OUTSIDE THE STADIUM, AND I AM VERY PROUD OF MY ARSE!

Love Cheese and cauliflower power

Phil Jurek

And Cheryl Downes Said:-
oh God - that horrible smelly afghan - my Mum used to make me keep it in the garage.

My memories!
Meeting Sonja Kristina,streakers, teasing Eddie Jobson (who took it well) that he was too young to drink in the pub (17 he was), backstage for Gong and Curved Air, Mole breaking a bottle whilst drunk and Roger Eagle tearing ten strips off him,queuing all day,  unconcious Fish (a person) at the Space Ritual. Val Hills Pixie hat. Friends who are still around to this day. That Faust concert. Space Ritual recorded live. Headbanging. The tunnel. there are just so many memories!!!!!! AHHH just remembered..Arfas bowler hat a la Judy Teen for ......Cockney Rebel..He always was a wag..Ha ha ha still bloody is too!

Tony Johnson remembers Barclay James Harvest!
yes I remember the live gig at Liverpool Stadium in 1974. In fact
I helped the BJH roadies set up the stage and was then treated to an almost
private concert as the band rehearsed extensively for the live recording
that night. It was an exquisite half hour. I believe only a small amount of
the concert found its way onto the final recording. The original gig had
been cancelled at a very late stage due to a serious electrical problem. Let
me know if you need more info on this.

I must also confess to seeing the Irish Prog Rock band Fruupp at the Stadium
in 1975. A smallish but enthusiastic audience enjoyed that one. Bizarrely I
only remember those 2 concerts there.

Myke Crombleholmes memory!(is fine I think)

Immediate memories include Supertramp (19/10/74) poorly attended(!), AC/DC,Ted
Nugent, HMK.......love beads, love bites!!!!, huge submarine (sandwiches), "Wally" and more.

Shortie from Russ Reid:-
I was taken to see Can at the Stadium when I was 13. Holger was wearing white gloves and shook his head from side to side throughout, and the light show was a red light on one side of the stage and a blue one on the other. Amazing

One from Dave Dignum?
My first ever concert was at the Stadium, T/Rex.  The following also stick
out from the memory banks.
Hawkwind Space Ritual (best show ever seen)
Free farewell tour
Mott the Hoople Rock & roll circus, featuring the late Max Wall, who when
bombarded with cans etc. returned the fire & remained in good humour & won
the crowd over.
Sha Na Na.  Only got in for the encores, but they did about 13.
Roxy Music, really fresh new sound.
Sabbath, loudest group I ever heard, my ears rang for about 2 weeks.
Status Quo, many times always good show.
Supertramp, at the time one of the best support bands around.
Anyone remember the all day concerts that started about 4pm, nice hot dogs
from the stall.
The Sweet, many regulars trying not to be seen with younger brothers/sisters
in tow.
Waking up after Amsterdam Lil show and being asked to help clear away, I was
later offered a job as a roadie for them, but when I told them I was only 15
didn't have a driving licence & couldn't drive, was told it didn't matter I'd
learn !!!
Whatever happened to them?
I do remember the Cross Keys, but don't remember the name of the small pub
round the back.
Did anyone ever get the answer as to why we used to queue so early when we
had tickets(OK to get good speck) but why at about 4pm without any apparent
signal or reason did those who'd been seated on steps outside suddenly decide
to stand up till the doors opened about 3 hours later.
What a venue, hot, damp, bad accoustics but loads of atmosphere, never again
captured by the Empire, Royal Court etc.
Special times in a special place, more memories some time soon.
Thanks for such a good site.
Take care Dave.

For The Audience Remembers

Please use this if its got any merit at all.

Phil Williams.

 

The usual three oclock in the afternoon start. Sitting in the queue for a Hawkwind gig and drinking cider from a litre bottle. The queue was already stretching around the corner and I remember a chant was going up, started by a bunch of bikers about twenty people down from us. It went something like this.

Mother doesnt like Dave Brock, Dave Brock. Mother doesnt like Dave Brock

Mother doesnt like Stacia, Stacia. Mother doesnt like Stacia

It carried on in an army like fashion, gaining volume as it was picked up by the queue, until Mother hadnt liked the whole band. Then it started again. I recall staring at the stadium steps, all sparkling white in my memory, thinking I was in heaven.

Now this wasnt the Space Ritual concert, it was the one after, In Search Of Space I think, and heres a thing. I dont remember if I was at The Ritual. I remember going to the Stadium on that day, I remember having a ticket; I just have no memory of being at the gig.

So I believe it was getting dark when the notorious Ellere arrived and began to peddle his Nembies and Tuies (Downers to you and me) from a large clear plastic bag. Ten pence each I think. He also sold various hemp like substances which had numerous names but always turned out to be Red Leb, (or so I am reliably informed, never having dabbled myself, honest officer).  Anyway Mother doesnt like Lemmy, Lemmy. Mother doesnt like Lemmy.

By this time Im steaming. Those old geezers open the doors and I get rushed in, with a little help from my friends.

Now heres a thing. I cant remember anything of the gig. Except this one very, very important moment. The sirens start droning, the lights begin to strobe, the audience goes crazy as Hawkwind crank up Master Of The Universe, and.

Stacia is standing on stage, not ten feet away from me, looking directly into my eyes! I swear to god, she had one arm outstretched pointing at me and she was drilling a hole into the back of my head with her eyes.

Im sure that at that point the whole world dissolved and there was just the two of us alone in that huge space. Cant remember anything else about the gig.

Funny old thing memory eh?

Geoff P interjects..(but only occasionally)
Anyway my first gig there was the Free/Mott gig on Sep 19 1970 - I was 13 and Ill never forget that gig. Mott certainly stole the show - I guess they were all the time they were a support act. Anyway I fell in love with them and saw them every time they played the Stadium and once also at the Floral Hall in Southport, in June 71, the exception to their 3 monthly visits to Liverpool at that time. Because they did come every three months, I am absolutely certain that they played in March and Sep 71, and I know that Ive seen Peace and John Martyn supporting them (I met John in the lobby and asked him where Beverley was!). I dont think they ever played after the Dudes tour of Sep72.

CHARLIE ? Has early memories..
Just  found this site, bloody 'ell what memories (actually , truth is I hardly remember most of the bands I saw at the stadium,cough!).
Born in "55" so I'd be about 15 when I saw my first band at the stadium, it was "AMERICA".  Some memorial moments that seem to stick in my mind are:
ZAPPA & the encore shouting
FREE, god it was heaving in there that night, condensation was running down the back wall in rivers.
MOTT THE HOOPLES/ ROCK N ROLL CIRCUS & Max Wall enduring the crowd.
JETHRO TULL, they stopped playing & announced that a horse was causing trouble in the foyer, a bloke walked past the stage in full jockey colours, then they carried on where they left off.
THE FACES, always a great band, Lewisis store had a model of the band  under a glass dome.
RORY GALLAGHER, goin' to my hometown!!!!!
LED ZEPP, what a band, funny enough my son plays a lot of their stuff these days, it'll stay till the end of time.
THE SMELL of the place, if only you could bottle it .
THE CROSS KEYS, served anyone & everyone, whatever condition you were in!
THE MATCHBOX, the tiny pub round the corner.
ANYWAY....... there must have been trouble sometime but I never found it, the other venues never matched the STADIUMS presence, maybe it was a terrible place accoustically but the atmoshere in there was electric.  Bands don't play venues that size anymore 'cause of the money issues, shame really 'cause it's personal & magic.
If you think about The STADIUM attracted what would be classed as "STADIUM" bands these days,
irony of it all!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

CHARLIE the Wirral
great site cheers, I'll pass it on
ps AND VIRGIN RECORDS IN BOLD STREET
!!!

Hiya my mate,

don't know how to get this on your memory page so I am hoping you can copy and paste it and put it there for me.

Mine name is Wally and I went to the LS in the early 70`s.The one gig that stood out for me was the night what seemed the entire LFC Kop turned up.To start off the support act was Suzi Quatro ,her act went down like a bomb the crowd was drooling all over her as a very sexy leather gal yank.Next up where Thin Lizzy (What a band) at least I thought they where but by now the crowd had got themselves in a frenzy as the expectation was too great waiting for the first showing of Slade in Liverpool.

Now came the famous headline breaking news,Thin Lizzy got attacked by the chairs thrown on the stage from the front by the crowd,worse was to come as the band struggled to win over the crowd and the lead singer whom you all know had a disaster,his amplifier blew up.

Then came the quick exit,it was touch and go as to whether Slade should play,but the management decided for safety reason that the headline band should play.

And what a night it turned out to be,it ended with Noddy Holder singing "you`ll never walk alone" (and picture this) A massive sway of red and white scarves in the middle of the stadium directly in front of the stage.I swear they hired the Kop that night! The whole Stadium joined in that final encore,the other highlight (disaster) was Dave Hill when making his exit (was he running off in fright?) fell off the stage and broke his ankle. Those of you who remember would have seen the next day in the Echo front page news of the damage to the seating and of course Dave Hill!! I think it took Slade a few years more before we could see them live in Liverpool for no venue would touch them. They eventually got the Mountford Hall,with no seating; standing only and Noddy opening shot was "Your own fucking fault yer have noooo seats,yer all knooow why" but another great night.Did I see Jeff beck at LS? certainly watched Hawkwind many a time and the Kinks,Mott the Hoople (Ian Hunter at his best) Promoting their only number one single "All the young dudes" had a few hurdles to over come but had the crowd buzzing at the end. Roy Wood and Wizzard took the LS by storm what a guy and talent !! The Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin gigs were straight out of the top draw.

I could go on but I will leave it to you guys to fill in the blank spaces!!

Thanks for the great site and letting me having a blast after all theses years!!

Wally-C

 

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